Lessons & Units :: Friends: True Stories of Extraordinary Animal Friendships 1st Grade Unit

Paired Text Questions: "From Calf to Camel" and Friends: True Stories of Extraordinary Animal Friendships

Lesson Plan

Friends: True Stories of Extraordinary Animal Friendships

Friends: True Stories of Extraordinary Animal Friendships
Learning Goal
Integrate information from the non-fiction passage “From Calf to Camel” and the book Friends: True Stories of Extraordinary Animal Friendships to write or speak about camels more knowledgably.
Necessary Materials
Provided:
  1. Questions
  2. Non-fiction reading passage “From Calf to Camel”

Not Provided:
Friends: True Stories of Extraordinary Animal Friendships
 
  • Questions 1 and 2 refer to the non-fiction passage “From Calf to Camel.” Questions 3 and 4 refer to the book Friends: True Stories of Extraordinary Animal Friendships. Questions 5 and 6 refer to both the passage and the book.
  • Student versions of the questions are in the 'Texts & Materials' tab.
 
Part 1: "From Calf to Camel"
 
Read the passage “From Calf to Camel” out loud to your students. Alternatively, students can read the passage independently or as a group.
 
Question 1: Describe what a camel looks like, including its neck.
 
Sample student answer: Students may respond by mentioning any of the physical features of a camel described in the passage. These include long legs, one or two humps, and a coat that can turn from white to brown over time. All answers should mention the camel’s long neck.
 
Question 2: Why might calves stay with their mothers until they are five years old?
 
Sample student answer: Based on information from the passage, students may indicate that calves might stay with their mothers until they are more independent. Students may reason calves probably need help from their mothers while they're still young and not quite strong. For example, sometimes a calf has trouble standing up because its legs may be a little wobbly.
 
Part 2: Friends: True Stories of Extraordinary Animal Friendships
 
Question 3: Ldinka is a camel that lives in a zoo in Siberia. There is a fence between the part of the zoo where she lives and the part of the zoo where some pigs live. What did she do one day while standing next to the fence?
 
Sample student answer: Ldinka moved her neck over and down the fence.
 
Question 4: How did Ldinka’s neck help her become friends with one of the pigs at the zoo where she lived?
 
Sample student answer: Ldinka’s neck helped her become friends with one of the pigs because it was long and curvy. That allowed her to stretch it over the fence and connect with one of the pigs living on the other side.
 
Part 3: “From Calf to Camel” and Friends: True Stories of Extraordinary Animal Friendships
 
Question 5: How is Ldinka the camel like the camels described in the passage?
 
Sample student answer: Ldinka has a long neck.
 
Question 6: Is making friends with pigs something camels normally do? Support your answer with information from the passage, the book, or both the passage and the book.
 
Sample student answer: Any answer with a basis in the passage and/or the book is acceptable. For example, students may respond that camels do not normally make friends with pigs. The passage describes what camels are like and does not say anything about them becoming friends with pigs. Also, the book is about “extraordinary” animal friendships. That means the friendships described in it, such as the one between Ldinka and the pig, are very unusual.

Texts & Materials

Standards Alignment

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