Lessons & Units :: Genre Studies: Informational Texts 1st Grade Unit

Lesson 2: Table of Contents and Index

Lesson Plan

I Wonder Why Spiders Spin Webs and Other Questions About Creepy Crawlies | 820L

I Wonder Why Spiders Spin Webs and Other Questions About Creepy Crawlies
Learning Goal
Explain that informational texts often include a table of contents or index to find information about a topic.
Use a table of contents or index to find information about a topic.
Duration
Approximately 50 minutes
Necessary Materials
Provided: Unit Example Chart, Independent Practice Worksheet
Not Provided: I Wonder Why Spiders Spin Webs and Other Questions About Creepy Crawlies by Amanda O’Neill, A First Look at Animals: On the Farm, chart paper, markers, Copies of the table of contents and index from I Wonder Why Spiders Spin Webs and Other Questions About Creepy Crawlies
  • Teacher Modeling

    will explain to students that another characteristic of informational books is that they often include text features that help you find information such as a table of contents and index. I will add these features to my Characteristics of Informational Texts Chart that I started in Lesson 1 (Example Chart is provided in Unit Teacher and Student Materials). I will explain that a table of contents comes at the beginning of a book. It tells the reader the heading for each chapter of a book, and what page each chapter starts. An index is at the back of a book. It tells the reader what topics are in a book and on what page you can find information about a topic. I will model using these features in a familiar informational text (from Lesson 1), A First Look at Animals: On the Farm. I will show the table of contents and explain that I want to find information about donkeys. The table of contents shows me that I can find this information on page 18, so I will flip to that page to verify that there are facts about donkeys. Then, I will explain that I want to learn about sheep. I will check the index in the back of the book to see where I can find this information. I see that I can turn to page 8 to learn about sheep. I will flip to the page and read some facts to verify that there are facts about sheep. Since this book has a table of contents and index, I will add the title to the chart.

  • Think Check

    Ask: "How did I use text features to find information about a topic in an informational text?" Students should reply that you looked at the table of contents at the beginning of the book to find chapter headings and page numbers related to your topic. You used the index in the back of the book to find the page number for any topic in the book.

  • Guided Practice

    will work together to use the table of contents and index to locate specific information in I Wonder Why Spiders Spin Webs and Other Questions About Creepy Crawlies by Amanda O’Neill. We will use the table of contents and index to locate information about spiders, beetles, and moths. As a class, we will explain which text feature we used and which page the text feature told us to turn to. We will turn to those pages in the book to read and verify that the information that we want is there. We will reflect that this informational text has a table of contents and index, so we will add the title to our Characteristics of Informational Books Chart.

  • Independent Practice

    will use a copy of the table of contents and index from I Wonder Why Spiders Spin Webs and Other Questions About Creepy Crawlies to figure out where to find information about topics in the informational book. You will write down the page number where the information can be found. You will also explain how you know this is an informational book. After you are done, you will share with your answers with the class, and the teacher will verify the pages where the information is located in the book by reading the pages aloud. (Independent Practice Worksheet is provided.)

Build Student Vocabulary confuses

Tier 2 Word: confuses
Contextualize the word as it is used in the story Moths use the light from the moon and stars to guide them at night. “A bright lamp just confuses them.”
Explain the meaning student-friendly definition) To confuse means to puzzle or mix something up so it is not clear. If something confuses you, it means you do not understand it because it is unclear. A moth is confused by a bright lamp because it thinks the lamp is the moon. The lamp confuses, or mixes up the moth.
Students repeat the word Say the word confuses with me: confuses.
Teacher gives examples of the word in other contexts It confuses me when the teacher talks too quickly. I need her to slow down so I can understand. It confuses me when I have too many choices. The math problem confuses me. I need to study harder.
Students provide examples What confuses you? Start by saying, “_______ confuses me because________.”
Students repeat the word again. What word are we talking about? confuses
Additional Vocabulary Words armor

Build Student Background Knowledge

After working with I Wonder Why Spiders Spin Webs and Other Questions About Creepy Crawlies, explain to students that even though spiders and insects are both considered creepy crawlies, they are both very different kinds of animals. Spiders have eight legs and two parts of their main body (the head and the abdomen). Other insects, such as flies and bees, are part of the “insect” family. They only have six legs and have three parts of their main body (the head, the abdomen, and the thorax). However, spiders and insects do have some things in common—a skeleton on the outside and legs with joints, for example.

Texts & Materials

Standards Alignment

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