Lessons & Units :: Plot 1st Grade Unit

Lesson 3: Identifying Story Elements (1st grade)

Lesson Plan

100th Day Worries | 360L

100th Day Worries
Learning Goal
Identify and describe the story elements in a story (characters, setting, problem, solution).
Duration
Approximately 50 minutes
Necessary Materials
Provided: Example Graphic Organizer for Direct Teaching, Guided Practice Worksheet, Independent Practice Passage, “Franklin and the Honey Cake” and Worksheet
Not Provided: 100th Day Worries by Margery Cuyler, Don’t Forget to Come Back by Robie H. Harris, chart paper, markers
  • Teacher Modeling

    will explain that other elements of a story, such as characters and setting helps readers to better understand the plot. I will use a graphic organizer to identify and describe the characters, setting, main problem, and main solution in 100th Day Worries. (Example graphic organizer is provided.)

  • Think Check

    Ask: "How did I identify all the story elements?" Students should respond that you read the text and paid close attention to who was in the story (characters), where and when the story is taking place (setting), and the problems and solutions in the story.

  • Guided Practice

    will read Don’t Forget to Come Back by Robie H. Harris. We will complete a graphic organizer, identifying the characters, setting, main problem, and main solution in Don’t Forget to Come Back. (Example graphic organizer is provided.)

    TIP: Try incorporating movement into the lesson by having students clap when they hear a character mentioned in the story, pat their head when they hear details about the setting, rub their chin when they hear the problem, and tug on their ear when they hear the solution. This will focus student listening and provide scaffolding for struggling students.

  • Independent Practice

    will follow along as I read the passage “Franklin and the Honey Cake”. (Passage is provided.) You will complete a graphic organizer, identifying the characters, setting, main problem, and main solution in the story. (Independent Practice Worksheet is provided.)

    TIP: Extending the lesson - Have students identify characters, setting, problem, and solution and then write a story using those elements. They can use Independent Practice for Lesson 3 as a way to brainstorm their ideas.

Build Student Vocabulary groaned

Tier 2 Word: groaned
Contextualize the word as it is used in the story When Jessica’s teacher told the students that they would have to bring a collection of 100 things to school for the 100th day of school, Jessica “groaned to herself.”
Explain the meaning student-friendly definition) To groan means to make a low sound to show that you are unhappy. When Jessica groaned, she made a low sound with her voice to show that she unhappy with the project her teacher assigned in class.
Students repeat the word Say the word groaned with me: groaned.
Teacher gives examples of the word in other contexts I groaned when my dad said I could not stay up late. I was upset that I was not allowed to stay up late. I groaned when I hurt my toe. I was upset and in pain because it stung.
Students provide examples When have you or someone you know groaned? Start by saying, “I groaned when ______________.”
Students repeat the word again. What word are we talking about? groaned
Additional Vocabulary Words swallowed, dumping

Build Student Background Knowledge

After reading the passage "Franklin and the Honey Cake," explain that when someone says, "you sing like a bird" they are probably providing you with a compliment (or saying something nice) because birds songs are famous for being beautiful to listen to. Birds sing to communicate with other birds. Even if the song is beautiful, it does not mean that a bird is happy. Sometimes male birds will sing to warn another bird to stay away. Other times, birds sing to attract other birds. Time permitting, listen to a bird song with your class.

Texts & Materials

Standards Alignment

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