Lessons & Units :: Cause and Effect 2nd Grade Unit

Lesson 3: Cause and Effect Relationships

Lesson Plan

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day | 970L

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
Learning Goal
Identify explicit cause-and-effect relationships in fiction.
Duration
Approximately 50 minutes
Necessary Materials
Provided: Everyday Causes and Effects Chart, Guided Practice Example Chart, Independent Practice Worksheet
Not Provided: Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst, chart paper, markers
  • Teacher Modeling

    will explain the relationship between causes and effects in everyday life and in literature. I will introduce the “Everyday Causes and Effects Chart” and read it aloud. (Direct Teaching Teacher Example Chart is provided in Teacher and Student Materials below.) I will tell students that as we read the book Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst, we will match the cause-and-effect relationships.

  • Think Check

    Ask: How did I match each cause to the correct effect? Students should respond that you thought about how they are related and matched the causes and effects based on what made sense.

  • Guided Practice

    will work together to match the causes and effects from the book, stopping at page 13. (Guided Practice Teacher Example Chart is provided below.)

  • Independent Practice

    will listen as I read the rest of the book. You will match the causes to the effects from the rest of the book. (Student Independent Practice is provided below.)

Build Student Vocabulary cavity

Tier 2 Word: cavity
Contextualize the word as it is used in the story When Alexander went to the dentist, the dentist found a cavity in one of his teeth.
Explain the meaning student-friendly definition) A cavity is a small hole in a tooth. The dentist found a small hole in Alexander’s tooth.
Students repeat the word Say the word cavity with me: cavity.
Teacher gives examples of the word in other contexts It is important to brush your teeth so you do not get any cavities. If a dentist finds a cavity he will need to fill it in, so that the cavity does not get bigger.
Students provide examples Have your teeth ever been checked for cavities? Where? Who checked them? Tell me about it by saying, “Once I got my teeth checked for cavities at _____________.” If not, describe how you imagine a cavity would feel. Say, “I think a cavity would feel _______________.”
Students repeat the word again. What word are we talking about? cavity
Additional Vocabulary Words tack, code

Build Student Background Knowledge

Stop on the page where Alexander goes to the dentist (p.13). Explain to students that cavities develop when a tooth breaks down or begins to decay. A cavity is a hole that can grow bigger and deeper over time. Ask students what they think causes a cavity. Explain that plaque, or the build up of food bacteria in your teeth causes a cavity. Therefore, brushing, flossing, and going to a dentist are very important.

Texts & Materials

Standards Alignment

(To see all of the ReadWorks lessons aligned to your standards, click here.)

User Comments

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