User4 Lessons & Units :: Drawing Conclusions 2nd Grade Unit

Lesson 2: Text–to–Self Connections

Lesson Plan

Julius, the Baby of the World | 460L

Julius, the Baby of the World
Learning Goal
Identify and describe personal connections to the text.
Duration
Approximately 50 minutes
Necessary Materials
Provided: N/A
Not Provided: Julius, Baby of the World by Kevin Henkes, Ira Sleeps Over by Bernard Waber, lined paper
  • Before the Lesson

    After reading Ira Sleeps Over, share with students the origins of Ira's favorite toy, his teddy bear. Explain that the teddy bear was named after Teddy Roosevelt, the 26th President of the United States of America. On a bear hunt, President Roosevelt saved a wounded bear. The newspapers printed a cartoon with Teddy holding a small, cuddly bear, and after that, stuffed bears were known as "teddy bears."

  • Teacher Modeling

    will explain to students that good readers think about how the story relates to their own lives to understand the story better. I will explain that when we draw conclusions or make connections, we combine what we already know with what we’ve read in the text. When we make a personal connection, we combine what we already know based on our own experiences and the information in the text in order to understand the text better. I will give an example of a familiar book previously read aloud in class and name the connections I made to my own life that helped me understand the story better. (For example, I may use Julius, Baby of the World by Kevin Henkes. I could explain that since I am the oldest and have a little brother, I know how it feels to be the only child and then have a baby come. I felt a little jealous. When I read in the story that Lily is mean to Julius, I think it is because she is jealous of the attention he is getting, because I am thinking about a similar experience of my own.) I will explain that when books make us think about our own lives, we are making a connection that helps us understand the story better.

  • Think Check

    Ask: How did I make a personal connection to the story? Students should respond that as you read the story you thought about a similar experience you had before. Then you thought about how that helped you understand the story better.

  • Guided Practice

    will read Ira Sleeps Over by Bernard Waber aloud, stopping at page 25. We will chart and discuss personal connections we have with the text. For example, Ira listens to his sister more than his mom and dad. I know sometimes that I believe my older sister more than my mom and dad because I think she is smart and honest. Ira must think that of his sister because he believes her more than his mom and dad. We will finish reading Ira Sleeps Over aloud.

  • Independent Practice

    will write about something the end of the story reminded you of in your own life, a connection that helped you understand the story better.

Build Student Vocabulary disguises

Tier 2 Word: disguises
Contextualize the word as it is used in the story Lilly tried to frighten Julius by wearing disguises.
Explain the meaning student-friendly definition) A disguise is something that hides a person. When Lilly puts on a disguise, she dressed in a way to hide who she really is and scare Julius.
Students repeat the word Say the word disguise with me: disguise.
Teacher gives examples of the word in other contexts A woman might put on a disguise consisting of a hat that covers her hair, a false mustache, and man’s suit so that no one will recognize her. Superheroes wear disguises, so no one knows that they are powerful. The man wanted to get into the baseball stadium, so he disguised himself as one of the players. The officials found him out, because his disguise had the wrong team emblem on it.
Students provide examples Have you seen someone in a disguise? Start by saying, “On Halloween, I saw someone in disguise. They were dressed as ______________.”
Students repeat the word again. What word are we talking about? disguise
Additional Vocabulary Words showered, admired

Build Student Background Knowledge

After reading Ira Sleeps Over, share with students the origins of Ira's favorite toy, his teddy bear. Explain that the teddy bear was named after Teddy Roosevelt, the 26th President of the United States of America. On a bear hunt, President Roosevelt saved a wounded bear. The newspapers printed a cartoon with Teddy holding a small, cuddly bear, and after that, stuffed bears were known as "teddy bears."

Texts & Materials

Standards Alignment

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