Lessons & Units :: Setting 3rd Grade Unit

Lesson 2: Setting’s Effect on a Character's Actions

Lesson Plan

Tripping Over the Lunch Lady and Other Stories | 790L

Tripping Over the Lunch Lady and Other Stories
Learning Goal
Identify and describe how the setting affects the character’s actions.
Duration
Approximately 50 minutes
Necessary Materials
Provided: Direct Teaching Example Chart
Not Provided: Tripping Over the Lunch Lady and Other Stories edited by Nancy E. Mercado, chart paper, markers
  • Teacher Modeling

    will explain that the setting of a story affects the character’s actions in the story. For example: If there is a thunderstorm and I am outside, I may wear a rain coat and rain boots and run somewhere to take cover from the storm. If it is a thunderstorm and I am inside, I may watch the rain through my window and curl up on the couch and read a good book. The setting affects my actions. I will model using context clues and visualization to determine the setting at the beginning (page 60) of “Science Friction” by David Lubar in Tripping Over the Lunch Lady and Other Stories, edited by Nancy E. Mercado. I will discuss the time setting on page 61 and explain how the time of year affected Ms. Adler’s actions (loud display to get students’ attention after vacation). I will continue to discuss the setting and how it affects the characters’ actions as I read up to page 67. (Direct Teaching and Guided Practice Example Chart is provided below in Teacher and Student Materials.)

    TIP: Throughout the Direct Teaching and Guided Practice, discuss setting in terms of when and where.

  • Think Check

    Ask: How did I identify how the setting affects the character's actions? Students should respond that you read a few pages and thought about the setting. Then you thought about what the characters were doing and how their actions were affected by the setting of the story.

    TIP: If students struggle with determining how the setting affects characters’ actions, re-teach the lesson using a picture book such as Thunder Cake by Patricia Polocco.

  • Guided Practice

    will use context clues and visualization to identify the setting and how it changes in the middle of the story. We will discuss the evidence that helps us visualize the setting on page 68. We will discuss how this setting affects the characters’ actions. For example, Ellen said, “Ewwww” and tiptoed in, George sat on a hamper and Benji climbed on a mound of dirty clothes. We will continue identifying how the setting affects the characters’ actions, stopping after page 74. (Direct Teaching and Guided Practice Example Chart is provided below.)

  • Independent Practice

    will listen as I read the end of the chapter and use context clues and visualization to determine the setting at the end of “Science Friction”. You will explain how this setting affects the characters’ actions. You will write a paragraph explaining how their actions would have changed if the setting had been different, such as a neat bedroom. Would they have felt it was okay to hide food in a bedroom that was clean? What would they have done with their food instead?

Build Student Vocabulary complex

Tier 2 Word: complex
Contextualize the word as it is used in the story Mrs. Adler complemented the team on their project. “‘I’m impressed,’ she wrote, ‘that you worked so nicely as a group and immediately got started on a well-planned and complex project. Your use of familiar food items was especially clever,’”
Explain the meaning student-friendly definition) Complex means having many parts, details, or ideas that relate in a complicated way. When Mrs. Adler told the group that their project was complex, she meant that their project was complicated.
Students repeat the word Say the word complex with me: complex.
Teacher gives examples of the word in other contexts The math problem was complex. There are many steps that I need to take in order to solve it. Learning to read is complex, but I feel confident in my ability to sound out and understand difficult words.
Students provide examples Describe something that is complex for you. Start by saying, “________________________ is complex.”
Students repeat the word again. What word are we talking about? complex
Additional Vocabulary Words discoveries, mentioned

Build Student Background Knowledge

Stop on the first page of the story and explain that hydrogen and oxygen are two different chemical "elements." The elements are the building blocks for all matter. There are 117 known elements, some of which are familiar to us, like gold and aluminum. Explain that when you combine different elements, you produce different substances. For example, H2O is made of two hydrogen atoms and 1 oxygen atom. Direct students to the periodic table to learn more about the elements.

Texts & Materials

Standards Alignment

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