Lessons & Units :: Voice 4th Grade Unit

Lesson 2: Compare and Contrast Author’s Voice

Lesson Plan

The Random House Book of Poetry for Children | NP

The Random House Book of Poetry for Children
Learning Goal
Compare and contrast words and phrases in poems with different voices.
Duration
Approximately 50 minutes
Necessary Materials
Provided: Direct Teaching Example Chart, Guided Practice Example Chart Not Provided: The Random House Book of Poetry for Children by Jack Prelutsky, chart paper, markers
  • Teacher Modeling

    will explain that the words and phrases of a poem are dependent on the author’s voice. For example, a poem with a serious voice will have very different words and phrases than a poem with a silly voice. I will read “Since Hannah Moved Away” (p. 114) by Judith Viorst in The Random House Book of Poetry for Children selected by Jack Prelutsky aloud. I will give examples of the words and phrases in the poem that help me identify the voice of the poem. The author’s voice in the poem is sad. She uses phrases such as “the tires on my bike are flat,” “the sky is grouchy,” “chocolate ice-cream tastes like prunes,” and “nothing’s fun to laugh about.” (Example chart is provided.) I will then read “I Hate Harry” (p. 104) from The Random House Book of Poetry for Children aloud and identify the words and phrases that help me identify the voice as “angry.” I will compare and contrast the words and phrases used in the two poems.

  • Think Check

    How did I compare and contrast the voice in the two poems? Students should respond that you used the author's words and phrases to identify the voice of each poem. Then you thought about how those words are similar or different.

  • Guided Practice

    will read “Good-by My Winter Suit” (p. 43) by N.M. Bodecker in The Random House Book of Poetry for Children and identify the words and phrases that support the author’s voice. The author’s voice is excited. (Example chart is provided.) We will then read “When All the World is Full of Snow” (p. 31) by N.M. Bodecker from The Random House Book of Poetry for Children and identify the words and phrases from the poem that support the voice. The voice of the poem is quiet.

  • Independent Practice

    will compare and contrast the words and phrases in two new poems from The Random House Book of Poetry. Note to teacher: Feel free to choose any two poems from the book that have distinct and different voices. You may choose to use part one and part two of “The City,” on page 91. Note: You will have to provide a set of the poems for each student.

  • Reflective Practice

    After students complete the Independent Practice, have students read aloud the two poems highlighting the author’s “voice.” Have a classroom discussion on how the readings sound different from one poem to another.

Build Student Vocabulary swarming

Tier 2 Word: swarming
Contextualize the word as it is used in the story "I only want / to watch and wait / while snow moths settle / on the gate, / and swarming frost flakes / fill the trees / with billions / of albino bees."
Explain the meaning student-friendly definition) To swarm means to crowd something or somebody with a big mass. If the sky is swarming with frost flakes, it means that they sky is full of frost flakes.
Students repeat the word Say the word swarming with me: swarming.
Teacher gives examples of the word in other contexts The pool always gets swarmed by people in the summertime, because everyone wants to go outside. I hate seeing swarms of bees; they make me afraid that I’m going to get stung!
Students provide examples How do you feel when you’re in the middle of a swarm of people? Students should say, “When I’m in the middle of a swarm of people, I feel…”
Students repeat the word again. What word are we talking about? swarming
Additional Vocabulary Words shed

Build Student Background Knowledge

When charting the word "skunk" in "I Hate Harry," explain that skunks are mammals best known for spraying predators with liquid that is very smelly. Because of this ability, skunks to do not run away from predators, but stand and face them. Ask your students if they think the speaker in the poem calls Harry a skunk because she finds his ability to stand up to predators a sign of bravery, or because she thinks he stinks.

Texts & Materials

Standards Alignment

(To see all of the ReadWorks lessons aligned to your standards, click here.)