Lessons & Units :: The Story of Jackie Robinson, Bravest Man in Baseball 5th Grade Unit

Lesson 3: Events and Effects

Lesson Plan

The Story of Jackie Robinson: Bravest Man in Baseball | 760L

The Story of Jackie Robinson: Bravest Man in Baseball
Learning Goal
Explain the impact of a significant experience on a person’s life.
Duration
Approximately 2 Days (40 minutes for each class)
Necessary Materials
Provided: Events and Effects Chart 1, Events and Effects Chart 2, Events and Effects Worksheet (Student Packet, pages 15-16)
Not Provided: Chart paper, markers, The Story of Jackie Robinson, Bravest Man in Baseball by Margaret Davidson
  • Before the Lesson

    Read Chapter 6: “The Noble Experiment” – Chapter 8: “Oh, What a Year!;” Complete Student Packet Worksheets for Chapter 6: “The Noble Experiment” – Chapter 8: ”Oh, What a Year!”

  • Activation & Motivation

    Explain that there are some events in our lives that are significant, while there are other events in our lives that change us forever. For example, many of my teachers were good when I was growing up, but in 7th grade, I had an amazing teacher. S/he made me realize that stories were my gateway to the past. I think this teacher influenced me to eventually become a teacher, so I could share literature and history with others.

    Time permitting, ask for 1-2 volunteers who have had life changing experiences to come to the front of the classroom. The rest of the class will act as “biographers” and will ask interview questions about the event. Scaffold this activity by prompting students with sample questions, such as: Describe how the event happened. When did this happen? Who was involved? How did the event make you feel? How did your life change? Why was it important?

  • Teacher Modeling

    will explain that when I read a biography, I am reading about the important events that happened in a person’s life. Some events are important, like the ones we charted on our comic strip in Lesson 2, but other events are life-changing. They impact a character by making them grow, change, or realize something about the world. I want to be able to explain how life-changing events impact and affect a main character.

    To explain the impact of a life-changing event in the life of the main character in a biography, I will first identify an event that helped the character grow, change, or realize something about the world. Then, I will list the effects of the event, and finally use them to explain the impact of the event on the life of the main character.

    I will model explaining the impact of life-changing events in the life of Jackie Robinson. I will record the life-changing events on Events and Effects Chart 1. First, I will find and describe a life-changing event that happened to Jackie. I will focus on when Carl Johnson convinced Jackie that continuing to belong in a gang would break his mother’s heart. I will describe the event using Who?, What?, Where?, When?, Why?, How? Questions and record the information on the Events and Effects Chart 1. Note: See Events and Effects Chart 1 for specific examples.

    Then, I will write the effects of this event by looking for evidence in the text. I know that because of this conversation, Jackie dropped out of The Pepper Street Gang and worked hard at sports and academics in school. He was able to go to Pasadena Junior College and eventually UCLA because he left the gang and focused on sports and school.

    Finally, I will use this event to explain how it impacted him. I will record the impact on the Events and Effects Chart 1. This conversation changed Jackie’s life because he decided to leave the gang and stay out of trouble. Instead of taking his anger at prejudice out on his mother and his future, he used his feelings of anger to get into college, play professional sports, and make a positive difference in the world.

  • Think Check

    Ask: "How do I explain the impact of life-changing events on a character?" Students should respond that you identify an event that helped a character change, grow, or realize something about the world. You describe that event and its effects, and use the effects to explain how the event was made an impact on the character.

  • Guided Practice

    will examine the impact of the Minor League World Series between Montreal and Louisville on Jackie’s life. We will record our thoughts on the Events and Effects Chart 2. Note: See Events and Effects Chart 2 for specific examples.

    First, we will describe the event using our reporting questions—Who?, What?, Where?, When?, Why?, and How? We will describe how the players and audience in Montreal were so offensive and rude at the first game, they brought Jackie’s morale down to an all time low, and he was not able to play his best.

    We will list the effects of this event. When the teams got to Montreal, the crowd had heard about the disrespectful Louisville team. 5,000 crowd members booed at Louisville. Jackie realized that he was supported by his home team and his crowd, so he played his best game he could and won the Minor League World Series.

    Finally, we will explain how the experience of the Minor League World Series impacted Jackie. Jackie knew that he would face many opponents who did not like what he was doing, but the support he received from his home team encouraged him to push harder to victory. He realized that he could change the game, and that people were behind him. Because of this, he won the Series and was signed to the Brooklyn Dodgers as the first African-American baseball player in the Major Leagues.

  • Independent Practice

    will act like a reporter and explain the effects of Jackie being signed to the Brooklyn Dodgers. You will  describe how this happened, and list the effects you find in Chapter 7: “The Loneliest Man” and Chapter 8: “Oh, What a Year!” Finally, you will use that information to explain why the event was made a great impact on Jackie’s life. (See Student Packet pages 15-16.)

  • Reflective Practice

    will come together to discuss how being signed to the Dodgers affected Jackie’s life. We will extend the discussion to talk about how being signed to the Dodgers affected others and how it impacted the world.

Build Student Vocabulary unite

Tier 2 Word: unite
Contextualize the word as it is used in the story For this abuse, more than anything else, started to “solidify and unite the entire team behind Jackie. Not one of them was willing to sit by and see someone kick around a man who had his hands tied behind his back.”
Explain the meaning student-friendly definition) To unite means to bring together as a single unit for a common purpose. Jackie’s teammates grew united behind Jackie – they came together as a team for the reason of supporting Jackie from other racial attacks.
Students repeat the word Say the word unite with me: unite.
Teacher gives examples of the word in other contexts Schools unite students from many different backgrounds for one purpose: to learn. If you’re trying to convince your teachers to change a rule, you should unite with your friends to discuss it as a group. You can also say that you unite people who belong together: once the king was united with the queen, they were ready to rule the kingdom.
Students provide examples Can you give an example of a reason why you might unite a group of people? Students should say, “I might unite a group of people if…”
Students repeat the word again. What word are we talking about? unite
Additional Vocabulary Words heckled, tremendous, fumbled, despised, repulsive, confronted, taunt, insist

Texts & Materials

Standards Alignment

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