Lessons & Units :: Whoever You Are Kindergarten Unit

Paired Text Questions: "We Are Americans" and Whoever You Are

Lesson Plan

Whoever You Are | 280L

Whoever You Are
Learning Goal
Integrate information from the non-fiction passage “We Are Americans” and the book Whoever You Are to write or speak more knowledgably about what large groups of people have in common.
Necessary Materials
Provided:
  1. Questions
  2. Non-fiction reading passage “We Are Americans”

Not Provided:
Whoever You Are
 
  • Questions 1 and 2 refer to the non-fiction passage "We Are Americans." Questions 3 and 4 refer to the book Whoever You Are. Questions 5 and 6 refer to both the passage and the book.
  • Student versions of the questions are in the 'Texts & Materials' tab.
 
Part 1: "We Are Americans"
 
Read the passage “We Are Americans” out loud to your students. Alternatively, students can read the passage independently or as a group.
 
Question 1: What is one way that Americans may be different from each other? Make sure your answer comes from the passage.
 
Sample student answer: Responses may vary, as long as they reflect the passage. For example:
  • Americans may not look the same
  • Americans may speak different languages.
 
Question 2: What is one way that Americans are the same? Make sure your answer comes from the passage.
 
Sample student answer: Responses may vary, as long as they reflect the passage. For example:
  • Americans live in the United States.
  • Americans love their country.
 
Part 2: Whoever You Are
 
Question 3: What is one way that children all over the world are different?
 
Sample student answer: Responses may vary, as long as they reflect the book. For example:
  • Their skin may be different.
  • Their words may be different.
 
Question 4: What is one way that children all over the world are the same?
 
Sample student answer: Responses may vary, as long as they reflect the book. For example:
  • Their hearts are the same.
  • Their pain is the same.
 
Part 3: "We Are Americans" and Whoever You Are
 
Question 5: What is a difference Americans may have with each other that is also a difference children all over the world may have with each other? Make sure your answer is supported by the passage and the book.
 
Sample student answer: Responses may vary, as long as they reflect the texts. For example:
  • The way they look is a difference among Americans and children all over the world.
  • Using different languages is a difference among Americans and children all over the world.
 
Question 6: The passage states that Americans love their country. The book states that love is the same all over the world. Is the love that Americans have for their country the same kind of love that is described in the book? Why or why not? Support your answer with information from the passage, the book, or both.
 
Sample student answer: Responses may vary, as long as they are supported by the passage, the book, or both. For example, students may respond that the love Americans have for their country is not the same kind of love the book describes. It is a uniquely American feeling that is not shared by people living in other countries. Alternatively, students may respond that the love Americans have for their country is the same kind of love the book describes. The book states that love all over the world is the same, so the love Americans feel must be the same, in some way, as the love that everyone else feels. People in other countries may love their own country the way Americans love America.

Texts & Materials

Standards Alignment

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